Monitoring Wildland Fire Using Remote Sensing

The Fire Ecology Program has been conducting research supported by the Joint Fire Sciences Program, National Parks Service, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to improve methods for estimating the area and severity of prescribed fires and wildfires using satellite remote sensing. Research was conducted by GIS Fire Analyst Joshua Picotte, who is currently employed by USGS EROS in Sioux Falls, SD. Many of the improvements made through this research have been adopted by the inter-federal agency Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) program that aims to monitor wildfires and large prescribed burns throughout the nation. Much of Josh’s work has focused on gathering, checking, and designing databases for remotely sensed burn data from throughout the southeastern U.S.

Access to burn severity data and images are available on the Validating Burn Severity website.

Prescribed fires on Tall Timbers Research Station detected using remote sensing.

Prescribed fires on Tall Timbers Research Station detected using remote sensing.

 

References:

Picotte, J. and K.M. Robertson.  Validation of National Burn Severity Mapping techniques within the Apalachicola National Forest. [Presentation in PDF format].

Picotte, J.J. and K.M. Robertson. 2010. Remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain habitats. Tall Timbers Fire Ecology Conference Proceedings 24:86-93.

Picotte, J.J. and K.M. Robertson. 2009. Validation of remote sensing of burn severity in southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain community types. International Journal of Wildland Fire20:453-464.

Picotte, J.J. and K.M. Robertson. 2011. Timing constraints on remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in the southeastern U.S. Remote Sensing 3:1680-1690, doi:10.3390/rs3081680.

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