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www.TallTimbers.org
Vol. 2 | No. 3 | August 2009   

 

For past issues of Tall Timbers eNews, visit the eNews Archives

 

Management Recommendations & Natural History Notes 

Management Recommendations & Natural History Notes is a new feature of E-News that will appear in each edition. These are recommended land management practices provided by our research and land management staff to consider implementing during the months listed. Also included are brief natural history notes on some more notable natural happenings that you may see occurring in that month.

Month
Management  Recommendations
August
Fire Ecology
  • Prescribe burn logging slash or build brush piles.
  • Execute late growing season prescribed burns for native ground cover.
  • Establish fire breaks for next year’s spring burns. 
Forestry
  • Plan for regeneration by conducting a visual survey of mature longleaf pine trees for cone production.
  • Order seedlings early if regeneration is planned and cone crop is poor. Planting containerized seedlings in the fall can achieve better survival than waiting till later in the year.
  • If adequate cone crop plan for site preparation burn – to capture regeneration
  • Mow between alternate rows within pine plantations to eliminate competition and create different heights of vegetation.
Game Bird
  • Supplemental Feed at 1 bu/ac/yr  
  • Nest Predator Management if needed
Land Management
  • Good month to spray herbicides, girdle or fell hardwoods.
  • Plant second round of millet in dove fields for those who want grain available for the second phase of dove season.
  • Wetter dove fields should be planted with Japanese millet during this wetter month.
  • Plan deer survey route for spotlight counts (Florida only)
  • Mow roads and repair woods roads 
Vertebrate Ecology
  • Lake and pond draw-downs at this time of year can provide benefits for migrating shorebirds and wading birds.
  • Chimney Swifts begin to stage for migration and may use novel roosting sites, including the chimneys of abandoned tenant homes.
  • Swallow-tailed and Mississippi Kites gather in large migratory flocks and may forage over open fields.
  • Early songbird migrants appear; look for Yellow Warblers & Louisiana Waterthrushes along brushy wetland edges.
  • Hummingbirds venture from breeding habitats may show up at feeders almost anywhere – maintain feeding stations.
  • Gopher Tortoise nests start hatching; keep heavy equipment away from tortoise burrows.
  • Allow some lightning-struck trees to die and decay naturally for the benefit of snag-nesting wildlife.
 
September
Fire Ecology
  • Execute late growing season prescribed burns for native ground cover.
  • Establish fire breaks for next year’s spring burns.
 
Forestry
  • Apply fall herbicides for control of hardwoods.
  •  Conduct site-preparation burns to capture longleaf regeneration.
 
Game Bird
  • Begin to mow or chop hunting lanes in late September.
  • Mowing odd areas in late September.
  • Dog training.
  • Conditioning of horses and mules.
  • Supplemental Feeding at 1 bu/ac/yr.
  • Discontinue Predation Management.
 
Land Management
  • Plant fall food plots, if rainfall is sufficient.
  • Begin mowing or harvesting dove fields.
  • Plant second round of millet in dove fields for those who want grain available for the second phase of dove season.
  • Planting by mid-month is usually considered the best time to have most types of millet ready just before the October first phase of dove season.
  • Implement deer surveys to determine harvest strategy.
  • Herbicide applications for exotic grasses.
  • Herbicide applications for hardwood control.
 
Vertebrate Ecology
  • Fall songbird migration begins in earnest; watch for colorful birds along streamside zones and in hardwood forests.
  • Early Bald Eagles start to return to stake out territories and begin courtships.
  • Atlantic sturgeon begins fall migration from the Suwannee and Apalachicola Rivers to the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Red-cockaded Woodpecker translocations begin; trucks in the woods at night may be helping this endangered species. 

The mission of Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy is to foster exemplary land stewardship through research, conservation and education.